HIV Patients Exposed to A Higher Risk of Coronavirus

HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus – a deadly virus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, better known as AIDS. Transmitted through unprotected sexual intercourse, HIV/AIDS is one of the main deadly sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), although there are other possible ways of transmission. 

HIV patients in fear for their lives because of the new coronavirus

HIV, as deadly and dangerous as it is, is not uncommon. Back in 2018, there were approximately 37.9 million people affected by HIV around the world. 36.2 million of those were adults and around 1.7 million were children younger than 15 years. 

And it seems that it is Africa where most of the infected population with HIV – both adults and children, live. As of 2014, in Ghana, Africa, alone there have been roughly 150,000 people diagnosed with AIDS, and the assumption is that the numbers are even greater because of the well-known fear that HIV/AIDS is treated within Africa. But what is even more unfortunate is the fact that around 91% of the HIV-infected children live in Africa. 

HIV-positive individuals and AIDS patients are constantly living in fear for their lives because of how fragile their immune system is. And although therapy does help a lot, they are still treated as chronically ill individuals. 

Now, with the new coronavirus outbreak since early December, which first happened in Wuhan, China, it seems that this fear is even greater, and for a good reason, that is. Because of their poor immune system, HIV/AIDS patients are exposed to a higher risk of getting infected with the new coronavirus as compared to the general population.

The problem is that the coronavirus, although it causes flu-like symptoms, is also the cause of many death cases. In fact, as of 27th March, there have been roughly 28,269 deaths due to the coronavirus on a global level. In South Africa, there have been 1,170 infected and only one case of death. In Egypt, there have been around 536 infected and no dead, which is certainly good news. 

Because of their weakened immune system, these individuals are unable to fight off the infection, thus being exposed to a higher risk of not only being affected by it but also being affected by worse complications and possibly even death. That is why any chronically ill patients, including HIV/AIDS patients, are warned against the dangers of coronavirus.

They are advised to stay in self-isolation and practice social distancing as two of the best prevention methods that we know of when it comes to the coronavirus. Awareness has to be raised if we are interested in protecting these and any other chronically ill patients from the deadly coronavirus that does not seem to stop affecting more and more people all around the world, including Africa. 

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4924471/

https://www.hiv.gov/hiv-basics/overview/data-and-trends/global-statistics

http://www.healthdata.org/sites/default/files/files/images/news_release/2019/HIV%20Press%20Release%20-%20GHANA.pdf

https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/03/coronavirus-cases-top-100000-italy-deaths-rise-live-updates-200327231629838.html

We Are Faced with A Global Condom Shortage Due to The Coronavirus

We Are Faced with A Global Condom Shortage Due to The Coronavirus Image

Since the initial coronavirus outbreak, we have been faced with many challenges. Many of us have lost their close ones, their jobs, their businesses, etc. and we had to learn that money is not worth anything if you do not have your health. But today we learn about yet another great challenge that we are about to face – a global condom shortage due to the coronavirus.

A global condom shortage happening due to coronavirus

Practicing safe, protected sex by using a condom is the best way to prevent unwanted pregnancy and potentially life-threatening sexually transmitted diseases (STDs). But how are we supposed to practice safe sex if there are no condoms left in the world? Are we looking at STD numbers increasing in the following months due to the global condom shortage? The answer to that question is, unfortunately, yes. 

While the coronavirus has shut down many small businesses, restaurants, cafes, and shops, it has also put a lock on one of the biggest condom manufacturers – Malaysia’s Karex Bhd. Karex Bhd. is responsible for the production of one in every five condoms worldwide. Now, we are looking at a shortfall of 100 million condoms that has happened since the manufacturer has been forced to shut down its production. 

But Malaysia’s Karex Bhd. is not the only large condom manufacturer that has been affected by the coronavirus and forced to put a stop on their production. One other major condom-producing country is China which has now become recognized as the first country ever hit by the new coronavirus since early December.

The good news is that the company has been permitted to restart its production again, although with only half of its workforce. This would be the solution to protect the workers and still supply the world with the needed amounts of condoms to protect our reproductive health. 

However, for the people living in Africa where the number of new STD cases is constantly increasing, this temporary condom shortage will reflect negatively, causing even greater losses. If the rest of the world has to deal with a condom shortage for only two weeks to a month tops, things are not the same when it comes to Africa. In Africa, the condom shortage is expected to last up to a few months, which is scary and dangerous.

And a condom shortage could result in not only a rapid increase in STD cases but also in new coronavirus cases. If an unwanted pregnancy or an STD case is to happen, the people would have to go to the hospitals and ask for help – a place where we have all been advised to avoid except in major emergencies. Luckily, the Durex – one of the major brands, is offering their products online to help supply every one of us with the needed help to protect our reproductive health.

References

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2020/mar/27/global-condom-shortage-coronavirus-shuts-down-production

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-health-coronavirus-malaysia-karex/condom-shortage-looms-after-coronavirus-lockdown-shuts-worlds-top-producer-idUSKBN21E1OJ

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6188893/

Coronavirus Lockdown May Help Reduce The Spread of STDs

Coronavirus Lockdown May Help Reduce The Spread of STDs Image

Novel coronavirus disease, also known as COVID-19, has spread across the globe in a relatively short timeframe. The number of new infections keeps increasing and governments are introducing new, stricter measures to keep their citizens safe and prevent the pandemic from spreading even more. Coronavirus lockdown has changed our lives in many ways. People need to work from home, kids don’t go to school, everything has changed. What’s more, coronavirus lockdown may help reduce the spread of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs).

How can COVID-19 reduce the spreading of STDs?

The primary reason why STDs spread is that people engage in risky sexual behaviors and practices. It’s not uncommon for men and women to have multiple sexual partners. All these things can increase the likelihood of developing STD and spread it to other people who, then, go on to pass on the infection to someone else. The cycle continues! That being said, coronavirus lockdown has basically “forced” people to stay home. They no longer meet up with multiple men and women. At the same time, they do not practice risky sexual behaviors. In turn, the likelihood of STDs decreases and so does the chance to pass them on to someone else. 

It’s also worth noting that COVID-19 has increased stress and anxiety in millions of people around the globe. Both stress and anxiety decrease libido thus making a person lose interest in sexual activity. This could also be a reason why coronavirus lockdown could reduce spreading STDs to other people. Nobody wants to get infected so any type of contact with other people is reduced to a minimum. In fact, you are your safest sexual partner

Can I get COVID-19 through sex?

Novel coronavirus disease has sparked many debates and raised a lot of questions, particularly because it’s a new condition and little is known about it. That being said, there is no evidence nor confirmation by any health regulatory body that people can pass on COVID-19 to their partner through sexual intercourse. However, you can spread the disease through close physical contact. You see, the virus is spread through tiny infected droplets that you expel when sneezing, coughing, or exhaling. Then, these droplets can reach the nose or mouth of the other person and the infection is spread.

Conclusion

Coronavirus lockdown could reduce the spread of STDs in many ways. People limit their physical contact with other people, but also stress and anxiety have a negative impact on their sex drive. Bear in mind that protecting yourself from COVID-19 requires regular hand-washing and maintaining social distancing, as well as other safe practices recommended by healthcare experts. By protecting yourself you are actually protecting other people. 

References 

https://www.tht.org.uk/news/dont-hook-during-covid-19-lockdown

Is It Possible To Get Infected With Corona Virus Through Sex?

Is It Possible To Get Infected With Corona Virus Through Sex? Image

With more than 70 countries infected with Covid-19, this extremely delicate and contagious illness continues to spread. Because of its relatively new nature, many people are ill-equipped to prevent it. But, experts suggest, knowing exactly what the coronavirus is capable of can help people avoid it altogether. 

That’s exactly why we’ve decided to give you the proper guidance. If you’ve recently started dating again and you are worried you might get infected, it’s important to know how this illness gets transmitted in the first place. 

Here, we will focus on everything you need to know on Covid-19 transmission and whether it can get transmitted through sexual contact.

The Viral Droplet Matters, Here Is Why

Before we can talk about the connection between sexual contact and coronavirus, there is one thing you should know about, and that is the viral droplet. A virus is, in fact, a very small microbe that will stick itself to a cell, take it over, multiply, and move on to a new cell to find another host. This is the lifecycle of any virus, including Covid-19. 

A virus without a host can’t get transported via droplets of saliva or mucus. The droplet is the one that contains all those viral particles of the virus. When you sneeze, laugh, sing, breathe, etc., you eject these droplets either from the mouth or nose. They can end up on another person, object, or on the floor. For an individual to get infected, these droplets have to enter the body through the mouth, nose, or eyes. 

Can Corona Get Transmitted Through Sex?

When you talk about sex and Covid-19, you need to consider these droplets. Since these droplets carry the infection in the saliva and mucus, when you are kissing, you actually swap the infected spit. 

The droplets will then transmit to the uninfected individual, and the virus will start to invade the cells and multiply. When you see it from this perspective, then yes. You can transmit the virus while kissing during intercourse. 

But, do have in mind, it’s very early to tell if the infection could be transmitted through sexual acts. There isn’t any research or analytics that could confirm that. However, generally speaking, this is NOT a typical sexually transmitted disease, according to WHO (World Health Organization).

How to Avoid This Virus?

According to Prof. Gary Whittaker, at the Cornell University of Veterinary Medicine, this infection can rather easily be destroyed. 

Hygiene is very important. Make sure to wash your hands all the time and avoid close contact with an infected individual. Disinfecting surfaces can also be beneficial. Disinfectants will break down the small microbes and leave them harmless WHO suggests standing at least 3 feet from an infected individual. But, it’s difficult to avoid the virus if it’s being spread through saliva. If you believe to be infected, it’s best to get a checkup. 

Since March the 2nd, statistics show almost 90,000 individuals have been infected, and 3,000 have died.

References

https://www.cdc.gov/coronavirus/2019-ncov/locations-confirmed-cases.html

https://www.menshealth.com/health/a31206692/coronavirus-covid-19-sex/

https://economictimes.indiatimes.com/news/international/world-news/surfaces-sneezes-sex-how-the-coronavirus-can-and-cannot-spread/articleshow/74452682.cms

https://www.health.harvard.edu/blog/as-coronavirus-spreads-many-questions-and-some-answers-2020022719004#q11

https://www.who.int/docs/default-source/coronaviruse/situation-reports/20200302-sitrep-42-covid-19.pdf?sfvrsn=edd4f123_2

HIV Patients Exposed to A Higher Risk of Coronavirus

HIV Patients Exposed to A Higher Risk of Coronavirus Image

HIV stands for human immunodeficiency virus – a deadly virus that causes acquired immunodeficiency syndrome, better known as AIDS. Transmitted through unprotected sexual intercourse, HIV/AIDS is one of the main deadly sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), although there are other possible ways of transmission. 

HIV patients in fear for their lives because of the new coronavirus

HIV, as deadly and dangerous as it is, is not uncommon. Back in 2018, there were approximately 37.9 million people affected by HIV around the world. 36.2 million of those were adults and around 1.7 million were children younger than 15 years. 

And it seems that it is Africa where most of the infected population with HIV – both adults and children, live. As of 2014, in Ghana, Africa, alone there have been roughly 150,000 people diagnosed with HIV, and the assumption is that the numbers are even greater because of the well-known fear that HIV/AIDS is treated within Africa. But what is even more unfortunate is the fact that around 91% of the HIV-infected children live in Africa. 

HIV-positive individuals and AIDS patients are constantly living in fear for their lives because of how fragile their immune system is. And although therapy does help a lot, they are still treated as chronically ill individuals. 

Now, with the new coronavirus outbreak since early December, which first happened in Wuhan, China, it seems that this fear is even greater, and for a good reason, that is. Because of their poor immune system, HIV/AIDS patients are exposed to a higher risk of getting infected with the new coronavirus as compared to the general population.

The problem is that the coronavirus, although it causes flu-like symptoms, is also the cause of many death cases. In fact, as of 27th March, there have been roughly 28,269 deaths due to the coronavirus on a global level. In South Africa, there have been 1,170 infected and only one case of death. In Egypt, there have been around 536 infected and no dead, which is certainly good news. 

Because of their weakened immune system, these individuals are unable to fight off the infection, thus being exposed to a higher risk of not only being affected by it but also being affected by worse complications and possibly even death. That is why any chronically ill patients, including AIDS patients, are warned against the dangers of coronavirus.

They are advised to stay in self-isolation and practice social distancing as two of the best prevention methods that we know of when it comes to the coronavirus. Awareness has to be raised if we are interested in protecting these and any other chronically ill patients from the deadly coronavirus that does not seem to stop affecting more and more people all around the world, including Africa. 

References

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4924471/

https://www.hiv.gov/hiv-basics/overview/data-and-trends/global-statistics

http://www.healthdata.org/sites/default/files/files/images/news_release/2019/HIV%20Press%20Release%20-%20GHANA.pdf

https://www.aljazeera.com/news/2020/03/coronavirus-cases-top-100000-italy-deaths-rise-live-updates-200327231629838.html