Common STDs and How to Recognize Them

Online STI Test Kits For Home Use

Sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) are conditions passed from one person to another through sexual contact. Millions of people around the globe have STDs, especially in developing countries, including Ghana and other African nations. Prevention of STDs is entirely possible, but to make it happen, we need to get informed and learn as much as we can about them. The main purpose of this post is to highlight common STDs and show you how to recognize their symptoms.

Genital herpes

Genital herpes is a common STD caused by the herpes simplex virus. The virus is categorized into two types: HSV-1, which is mainly transmitted through oral-to-oral contact, usually causing cold sores, but can also induce genital herpes and HSV-2, which is an STD.

How common is genital herpes?

According to the World Health Organization (WHO), about 3.7 billion people under the age of 50, or 67% of the world population, have HSV-1 infection. About 417 million people aged 15-49, or 11% of the world population, have HSV-2 infection. Estimates show that 350 million women (87%) and 355 million men (87%) in Africa have HSV-1 virus. On the other hand, the HSV-2 virus affects 17 million women in 18 million men in Africa.

Evidence confirms that the prevalence of genital herpes in Ghana is high, and it could be attributed to high endemicity and inadequate intervention, especially in women.

Read More: Genital Herpes in Ghana

Who is at risk of developing genital herpes?

Generally speaking, every sexually active man or woman can develop genital herpes. That being said, some people are at a higher risk than others. Common risk factors associated with genital herpes include:

  • Having unprotected vaginal, anal, and oral sex
  • Having multiple sex partners
  • Having a sexual partner who tested positive for genital herpes
  • Being a woman

Symptoms of genital herpes

The ability to recognize the signs and symptoms of some STD helps an affected man or woman to get much-needed treatment. That’s why it’s important to learn how to recognize symptoms of genital herpes, particularly because most people are not even aware they have it. In most cases, symptoms are mild, and patients think they will go away on their own without realizing they have an STD, which they can transmit to other people.

Symptoms tend to develop two to 12 days after exposure to HSV. People usually experience:

  • Pain and tenderness in the genital area
  • Itching in the genital area
  • Small red bumps or tiny white blisters
  • Ulcers which can rapture, bleed, ooze, and make it difficult to urinate
  • Scabs on the sites where ulcers rapture

An affected person experiences flu-like symptoms during the initial outbreak. They may also experience headache, muscle ache, fever, and swollen lymph nodes in the groin. Sores associated with genital herpes develop on buttocks, thighs, anus, mouth, and even urethra. Women can also develop sores on the cervix and external genitals while men can notice them on scrotum and penis.

Men and women with recurrent herpes develop symptoms about 48 hours before the outbreak. They may notice tingling, pain, and itching at the site of infection. The pain may, in some cases, extend down to buttocks and knees.

Read More: Genital Herpes Symptoms

Why get treated?

Unfortunately, many men and women don’t go to see their doctor get this STD treated. When left unmanaged, genital herpes can lead to many complications such as increased risk to other STDs, meningitis, proctitis (rectal inflammation), bladder problems, and infection of the newborn.

How is genital herpes treated?

The cure which could eliminate genital herpes entirely doesn’t exist, but it is still possible to get the necessary treatment. The main objective of the treatment is to lower the chances of transmitting genital herpes to other people, reduce the frequency of occurrence, lower severity of symptoms, and help sores heal. For this purpose, doctors prescribe antiviral medications such as Acyclovir (Zovirax) and Valacyclovir (Valtrex).

Getting tested regularly is important, and luckily, today, you can order a test online and do it in the comfort of your home rather than scheduling an appointment at the doctor’s office.

Read More: Genital Herpes Treatment

Gonorrhea

Gonorrhea is an STD caused by infection with the bacterium called Neisseria gonorrhoeae, which tends to infect moist and warm areas of the body such as urethra, eyes, throat, vagina, anus, and female reproductive tract.

How common is gonorrhea?

Sometimes referred to as “the clap,” gonorrhea is one of the most prevalent STDs. On a global level, 87 million new cases of gonorrhea are diagnosed each year. Like many other STDs, gonorrhea is also more prevalent in developing countries. For example, one study showed that out of 950 subjects from Ghana, 28% of them had gonorrhea, and men were more likely to develop it than women.

Read More: Gonorrhea in Ghana

Who is at risk of developing gonorrhea?

Just like with other sexually transmitted diseases, every man or woman who engages in sexual intercourse can develop gonorrhea. But, the risk is higher in some groups. Factors that increase your odds of developing gonorrhea include:

  • Younger age
  • Having a new sex partner
  • History of other sexually transmitted diseases
  • History of gonorrhea
  • Having a sex partner who also has concurrent partners

Symptoms of gonorrhea

Some people have no symptoms at all, but it doesn’t mean there is no infection. The absence of symptoms can still mean you are infected and also able to transmit this STD to other people. Generally speaking, signs and symptoms of gonorrhea develop one to 14 days after the infection. Men and women experience gonorrhea differently, and below you can see how they feel when they develop this STD.

Men tend to experience:

  • Painful, red, warm and swollen joints
  • White, yellow, or green urethral discharge that looks like pus
  • Pain in the eyes, sensitivity to the light, pus-like discharge from the eyes
  • Pain in scrotum or testicles
  • Itching
  • Difficulty swallowing or swollen lymph nodes in the neck
  • Frequent or painful urination
  • Anal discharge, itching, and pain in the anal area bleeding when passing stool

On the flip side, women with gonorrhea may notice:

  • Fever
  • Pain during sexual intercourse
  • Swollen, red, warm, and painful joints
  • Vaginal discharge yellow or green in color
  • Swelling of the vulva
  • Frequent and painful urination
  • Sore throat, itching, difficulty swallowing, and swollen lymph nodes in the neck
  • Bleeding in between periods
  • Heavier periods
  • Abdominal or pelvic pain and vomiting
  • Bleeding after sexual intercourse
  • Itching and pain in the anal area

Read More: Gonorrhea Symptoms

Why get treated?

As seen above, some men and women may not notice any symptoms at all, but they are still infected. That is why it is crucial to get tested regularly, and home tests could be incredibly practical in this case. Being proactive about sexual health and symptoms of gonorrhea allows you to get the necessary treatment in a timely manner. When left ignored, gonorrhea can cause multiple complications such as infertility, an infection that spreads to other areas and joints in the body, a higher risk of HIV/AIDS, and complications in babies born to infected mothers.

How is gonorrhea treated

The primary route of treatment of gonorrhea is through antibiotics. Partners of infected men and women are also encouraged to get tested in order to prevent transmitting the STD back and forth or to other people.

Read More: Gonorrhea Treatment

Chlamydia

Chlamydia is a common, sexually transmitted disease that affects men and women alike. Just like other STDs, Chlamydia is caused by bacteria, and in this case, that is Chlamydia trachomatis. The STD can be spread through vaginal, anal, and oral sex, but it is also possible for pregnant women to spread Chlamydia to their babies during delivery.

How common is Chlamydia?

According to the WHO, about 127 million cases of Chlamydia are diagnosed each year. That is a staggering number. One of the most common reasons behind the ever-growing incidence of Chlamydia, especially in developing nations such as Ghana, is the lack of public awareness. In fact, the prevalence of STDs in Ghana is expected to grow as stigmatization continues. And, as you are already aware, stigmatization occurs due to the absence of the above-mentioned public awareness.

Read More: Chlamydia in Ghana

Who is at risk of developing Chlamydia?

Factors that increase a person’s risk of developing this sexually transmitted disease include:

  • History of some STD
  • Having sex without a condom
  • Changing multiple sex partners in a year
  • Being sexually active before the age of 25

Getting tested regularly can help decrease your risk of developing Chlamydia. Regular tests also raise awareness of this STD, fight stigmatization, and prevent spreading Chlamydia to other people. Besides “traditional” testing at clinics or hospitals, people can also get at-home tests for Chlamydia, which may be practical for those who want more privacy throughout the whole process.

Symptoms of Chlamydia

Chlamydia is often considered as “silent” infection because many people have it although they don’t experience any symptoms. But, just like with other STDs, the absence of symptoms can still mean you are infected, and you can transmit it to someone else. Bear in mind that even if Chlamydia doesn’t cause any symptoms, it can still damage the reproductive system. First signs and symptoms tend to occur one to two weeks after the exposure to the bacterium. Men and women tend to experience this STD differently. Below, you can see the signs and symptoms of Chlamydia in men and women.

Men may notice the following:

  • Pain in the testicles
  • Burning sensation while urinating
  • Pain in the lower abdomen
  • Green or yellow discharge from the penis

It’s also possible to get the infection in anus. In this case, a man may notice pain, bleeding, and discharge from this area.

On the other hand, women may experience these symptoms:

  • Bleeding between periods
  • Painful sexual intercourse
  • Cervicitis (inflammation of the cervix)
  • Pain in the lower abdomen
  • Vaginal discharge
  • Burning sensation while urinating

In some cases, the STD can spread to the fallopian tubes.

Read More: Chlamydia Symptoms

Why get treated?

Reasons to be proactive about the prevention and treatment of Chlamydia (as well as other STDs) are numerous. Besides lowering the risk of transmitting Chlamydia to someone else, you can also decrease the likelihood of experiencing various complications. When left ignored or unmanaged, Chlamydia can harm your health in more ways than one. Some of the most common complications include increased risk of other STDs, pelvic inflammatory disease, infection near the testicles, infections in newborns, infection of prostate, reactive arthritis, and infertility.

Read More: Chlamydia Treatment

How is Chlamydia treated?

Just like other STDs, Chlamydia is treated with antibiotics. A patient may receive a one-time dose, or he or she may need to take the drugs a few times a day for five to 10 days, depending on the severity of symptoms. Generally speaking, the infection goes away in one to two weeks. It goes without saying you need to abstain from sex during this time.

Syphilis

Syphilis is a sexually transmitted disease caused by bacterium Treponema pallidum, and it develops in four stages: primary, secondary, latent, and tertiary. The bacteria can spread from one person to another through direct contact with a syphilitic sore. Just like other STDs, this one also spreads through sexual contact i.e., vaginal, anal, and oral sex.

How common is syphilis?

The World Health Organization reports that 6.3 million cases of syphilis are recorded each year around the globe. In 2016, the last year for which data is available on a global level, 1 million pregnant women had active syphilis, which led to 350,000 adverse birth outcomes. Of these, 200,000 accounted for stillbirths and neonatal death. In Africa, the prevalence of syphilis is high, especially in males in rural areas. One study of pregnant women showed that the cumulative prevalence of syphilis among 4181 blood donors over a five-year period was 2.58% in Ghana.

Population-based studies show greater prevalence, and scientists point out that the lack of precise information can be correct with further research on this topic. More precise information allows scientists and healthcare professionals to create programs to raise awareness and prevent this STD from spreading.

Read More: Syphilis in Ghana

Who is at risk of developing syphilis?

You may have a higher risk of developing syphilis if these factors apply to you:

  • HIV infection
  • Regularly engaging in unprotected and risky sex
  • Man who has sexual intercourse with other men
  • Changing multiple sexual partners

Symptoms of syphilis

Symptoms of syphilis vary from stage to stage.

The primary syphilis is usually indicated by chancre (small sore), which appears on the site where bacteria entered the body. The chancre develops about three weeks after exposure to bacteria. It may be hidden in rectum or vagina, so many people don’t notice it. Chancre tends to go away on its own in one to three weeks. Some people can have one chancre only, but others may have several, and it tends to be painless.

Secondary syphilis occurs within a few weeks after the chancre has healed. A person may notice:

  • Rash starting on the trunk and spreading across the body
  • Sores in mouth or genitals
  • Hair loss
  • Muscle aches
  • Fever
  • Sore throat
  • Swollen lymph nodes

The above-mentioned symptoms may go away in a few weeks, but in some cases, they come and go throughout the year.

Latent syphilis occurs when a person isn’t treated in the first two stages. This phase has no noticeable symptoms, but it may last for years before it progresses to the tertiary stage. The last stage of syphilis involves the spreading of the STD to other organs such as the brain, blood vessels, heart, bones, liver, and joints.

Read More: Syphilis Symptoms

Why get treated?

Without proper treatment, syphilis can progress from one stage to another and cause a number of complications such as the formation of small bumps or tumors on the skin, bones, and other organs, cardiovascular problems, neurological problems, higher risk of HIV, and complications in pregnancy and with childbirth.

How is syphilis treated?

Syphilis is easy to treat when diagnosed in early stages when doctors usually prescribe penicillin. In most cases, one injection is necessary. In later stages, syphilis can be difficult to treat, which is why it’s crucial to see the doctor as soon as you notice sore on your genital area.

Read More: Syphilis Treatment

Conclusion

Sexually transmitted diseases are common but are preventable. Practice safe sex, get tested regularly, and learn how to recognize signs and symptoms. The more you know, the safer you are.

Read More: STD’s in Ghana

References

https://www.who.int/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/herpes-simplex-virus

https://www.who.int/news-room/detail/28-10-2015-globally-an-estimated-two-thirds-of-the-population-under-50-are-infected-with-herpes-simplex-virus-type-1

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6081947/

https://www.who.int/en/news-room/fact-sheets/detail/sexually-transmitted-infections-(stis)

https://bmcinfectdis.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12879-019-4035-y#Sec5

https://www.ghanahealthservice.org/ghs-item-details.php?scid=22&iid=78

https://bmcinfectdis.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12879-019-3967-6#Sec11

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC5998162/

Genital Herpes

Herpes Information

There are two types of venereal conditions. The first one comes from the Type 1 virus, while the other is Type 2. Though both are venereal diseases, they exhibit distinct clinical conditions. Type 1 virus mainly attacks the mouth and lips of a patient with painful blisters. Then Type 2 affects the genitals in both men and women. The most common is the lip herpes that people rarely associate it with any venereal virus. Though many terms it as disease, genital herpes is a condition like HIV. You will have to manage it for life.

Read More: HIV and AIDS

Analysis

Like all the others, genital herpes relies on sexual contact for its transmission. When one comes into contact with genital fluids from an infected person, the virus infects the foreign person. The debate around the transmission through oral saliva is still ongoing. The worrying trend is most of the infected persons do not realize that they are carriers. Like HIV, you may incubate the virus for a long period without displaying any clinical signs.

Read More: STDs in Ghana

The incubation period is not constant. The outbreak of the symptoms can be within a week or stay for months. Herpes symptoms will include any of the following.

  • Blisters around the mouth and lips
  • In both men and women, blisters on the genitals, buttocks and the anus
  • Painful itching of the blistering area
  • Open sores after the blister breaks and oozes fluids
  • Swelling of the lymph glands
  • Headaches and fever

Pregnant women can pass the disease to the baby during delivery. So, it is advisable to have cesarean delivery at childbirth. The complications on the baby may mirror or be severe than the parent.

Read More: Genital Herpes Symptoms

Clinical Testing

Most likely, the doctor can diagnose the sores by physical examination. But the standard practice is to have the fluid and tissues for laboratory testing. A clinical blood test can detect the herpes virus in its incubation period. In case you suspect of any exposure to the virus, seek medical opinion fast.

Product: Herpes Private Test Kit

Product: One Step Herpes Test

Treatment

Since it is a lifetime condition, the medication can only manage the clinical signs. Most doctors prescribe a combination of antiretroviral for a specific period. Treatment is usually at the onset of the outbreak until the symptoms disappear.

Self-medication at home is a supplement to conventional drugs. Proper hygiene with mild bathing soaps and drying the sores with a dry towel is highly effective in managing the ulcers. It helps in containing the blisters and accelerates the healing of the crusts.

Read More: Genital Herpes Treatment

Prevention

As you have more outbreaks, so does your immune system decline. It is useful if you abstain from sexual activities. This reduces the chance of contracting other diseases like HIV, gonorrhea, and syphilis. Pregnant mothers should take good care of themselves to avoid mother to infant transmission.

Read More: What’s Herpes and Benefits of Testing at Home

Read More: Genital Herpes in Ghana

References

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/326882486_SERO-prevalence_of_herpes_simplex_virus_type_1_and_type_2_among_women_attending_routine_Cervicare_clinics_in_Ghana

https://www.redelve.com/backend/images/article/1553841134.pdf

What’s Herpes and Benefits of Testing at Home

Herpes Information

Sexually transmitted diseases (STD) and infections (STIs) are widely prevalent across the globe, particularly in low- to middle-income countries, and Ghana is no exception. Genital herpes is one of the most common STDs, but most people don’t even know they have it. That’s where the tests step in. What are herpes and its causes? Why get tested? What are the benefits of home tests? Learn more below.

See all STD Test Kits

What is herpes?

Herpes simplex virus (HSV) is a viral infection that usually affects the mouth, genitals, and the anal area. We can divide HSV cases into two main types: HSV-1, which mainly causes oral herpes and HSV-2, which primarily causes genital herpes.

Due to this fact, HSV is a contagious virus, and it is transmitted through direct contact from one person to another. When it comes to the HSV-2 virus, a person becomes infected through sexual contact with a man or woman who already has this virus.

Who is at risk of herpes?

Generally speaking, everyone can develop herpes, but some people are at a higher risk than others. Common risk factors for genital herpes include:

  • Weak immune system
  • Having multiple sex partners
  • Having another sexually transmitted infection
  • Having sexual intercourse at a young age
  • Being a woman

Studies show that the seroprevalence of both HSV-1 and HSV-2 among women in Ghana is high. High prevalence of herpes could be down to high endemicity and ineffective intervention in women across the country. Seroprevalence is defined as the number of people in a certain population who test positive for some disease or condition based on blood serum (serology) specimen. Scientists found that there is low awareness of the clinical symptoms and other aspects of herpes among women. That’s why raising public awareness of genital herpes, symptoms, causes, could help lower the prevalence of this problem.

Read More: Genital Herpes in Ghana

What are the symptoms of herpes?

What many people don’t realize is that they can have herpes virus and still not display any symptoms. So, just because you don’t have visible symptoms, it doesn’t mean you are not infected or that you cannot transmit the infection to someone else. When symptoms do occur, they are:

  • Pain during urination
  • Blistering sores on genitals
  • Itching

It’s also useful to mention some people may experience flu-like symptoms such as tiredness, fever, swollen lymph nodes, headache, and lack of appetite.

Read More: Genital Herpes Symptoms

Why get tested for herpes?

The biggest problem in Ghana is the lack of public awareness of genital herpes. That’s the reason behind the growing prevalence. Getting tested for herpes could be a useful strategy to reduce the incidence of genital herpes but also to prevent infected people from transmitting it to others. Getting tested for herpes could also emphasize the importance of safe sex practices.

Generally speaking, it is not recommended to get a blood test for herpes unless symptoms are present. For example, not unless you have sores on your genitals or anus. That being said, reasons to get tested for herpes are numerous, including:

  • Sex partner is infected
  • You’re pregnant, and you or your partner has already had symptoms of genital herpes

Product: Right Sign Herpes Test Kit

Product: One Step Herpes Test

What is the home test for herpes?

Long gone are the days when you needed to schedule an appointment at the doctor’s office to test for herpes. The healthcare system is not that effective to suit a larger group of people, it can be overwhelming to sit in the waiting room to do the test, and there is no flexibility in the whole process. Home tests for herpes are able to fix all these problems.

Home tests for herpes are convenient; everyone can do them without having to schedule an appointment. There is no awkward or any other uncomfortable feeling. At the same time, you can do the test when you feel like you need it; no need to wait for the symptoms to show up first.

Genital Herpes Treatment

For example, if you’re wondering whether you have gotten herpes from someone, this test can show you. Bear in mind it is necessary to wait for about 12 weeks after the sexual activity before you get tested. Home test for herpes may also be useful if you find out your previous sex partner was infected, you’re about to start a new relationship, you have unprotected sex,  you’re very sexually active, and if you used a needle or syringe to inject drugs in your body that an infected person has already used.

All the above-mentioned scenarios are uncomfortable and stressful. Home tests are accurate, precise, and help take away any doubt you might have. Plus, doing the test is incredibly easy and discrete.

Awareness About Genital Herpes in the African Region

In a country like Ghana, where the public awareness of sexually transmitted diseases and infections is low, there is a stigma about deciding to get tested. That’s the reason why many people don’t do so. The home test doesn’t require a trip to some specific location, gives people the privacy they need to learn whether they are infected or not.

Read More: STD’s in Ghana

If you are a sexually active person who doesn’t practice safe sex, you probably want to know whether you have herpes or not, since it’s one of the most common problems that people develop. Finding out has never been easier. You can learn whether you have herpes or not from the comfort of your home, without stress, hassle, and social stigma.

Read More: All you need to know about STD in Africa

Getting a home test for herpes will help you protect yourself in the future, inspire you to be more careful, and also increase awareness of herpes. Thanks to home tests for herpes, people, especially women, have the ability to gain more control over their sexual and reproductive health, modify their lifestyle, and avoid potential problems in the future.

References:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC6081947/

https://mariestopes.org.gh/what-we-do/sti-testing/

Genital Herpes Treatment

Herpes Information

Genital herpes is a ubiquitous disease. In fact, according to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more than 1 in 6 of all adolescents and adults in the US have genital herpes. Further complicating this issue is the fact that we are frequently unable to fully get rid of this infection, borrowing one of my favorite quotes: “Unlike love, herpes lasts forever.” That does not mean we are completely defenseless, though, we have treatments that significantly reduce the symptoms and improve the quality of life for these patients, and that is the topic of this article.

Read More: Genital Herpes Overview

The medications most commonly used in the treatment of genital herpes are:

  • Acyclovir 400 mg thrice daily (standard dosage)
  • Valacyclovir 500 mg twice daily
  • Famcyclovir 250 mg thrice daily

Even though these medications are equally effective, acyclovir is usually the preferred medication, particularly because it is much cheaper than its competitors. The duration of treatment varies by whether the patient has a first outbreak, a repeat episode or is suffering from a severe form of the disease:

  • A duration of 10 days is usually sufficient for a first clinical episode of herpes simplex virus (HSV) infection.
  • Recurrent episodes are usually treated for five days.
  • Patients with 4-6 episodes or more per year, or with severe distress during episodes might choose to undergo suppressive therapy, which means treatment for longer periods of time (months to years).

Of course, not all episodes fit the molds of our guidelines. For example, it is acceptable to use double (800 mg) dose acyclovir for five days for severe episodes or use a shorter two-day course with double the dosage to shorten the treatment duration.

The disease affects each patient differently. A subset of the population might have heavier and more frequent outbreaks; thus, it is recommended to monitor patients for frequency and judge the costs/benefits of suppressive therapy accordingly.

Another vulnerable group includes patients with concomitant Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infections. The risk of disseminated HSV infection in these patients is high enough that suppressive therapy is almost always warranted.

Read More: Genital Herpes Symptoms

Antiviral resistant HSV has become an issue lately. Since the three medications mentioned above are overall similar in structure, resistance to acyclovir usually means resistance to all three of them, in these cases, the medications used are:

  • Foscarnet 40–80 mg/kg IV every 8 hours until clinical resolution is attained
  • Intravenous cidofovir 5 mg/kg once weekly
  • Topical Imiquimod or cidofovir over five days

The future for patients at risk of contracting HSV is clearly bright. There are multiple vaccine candidates currently being researched for prevention, some already in the later phases of clinical development, and showing significant promise.

Read More: Genital Herpes

References:

https://www.cdc.gov/std/herpes/stdfact-herpes.htm

https://www.who.int/reproductivehealth/publications/rtis/genital-HSV-treatment-guidelines/en/

https://www.uptodate.com/contents/treatment-of-genital-herpes-simplex-virus-type-2-in-hiv-infected-patients

https://www.cdc.gov/std/tg2015/herpes.htm

https://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S0264410X16002978?via%3Dihub