Syphilis Is Still A Life-Threatening Issue for Women in Sub-Saharan Africa

STIs are a major health concern for pregnant women across the entire Sub-Saharan Africa region, with a prevalence of 2.7%. Statistics show that every year, 1,640,000 pregnant women infected with syphilis remain undetected, including those who receive prenatal care. 

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More than 2 million women expecting a baby have syphilis in sub-Saharan Africa. That’s around 4% to 15% of all the women in the region.

This infection is the reason behind 50% to 80% of adverse effects for pregnant women that can result in disability or infant death.

But, there is one major problem in developing countries such as these.  Only a tenth of pregnant women actually get proper treatment or are diagnosed with syphilis. 

This emphasizes the need for proper syphilis treatment and testing, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, where the syphilis infection rate is so high.

Is There a Way to Control Syphilis In Pregnant Women?

The technology to control, manage, and treat syphilis has been accessible globally for decades. Syphilis treatment and screening is the best cost-effective way to reduce mortality in infants by boosting the child’s immune system. 

These treatments help mothers stop the transmission from infecting either their partner or child. 

But, despite its efficiency, this treatment hasn’t been implemented in most health facilities across sub-Saharan Africa. Studies show that even though it’s a national policy to screen pregnant women for syphilis while they receive prenatal treatment, many women are not screened. 

This increases the chances of infant mortality rates, which can have a serious impact on both the child and the woman’s health. 

What Happens to Women Who Don’t Get Treated for Syphilis?

Women who don’t get adequate syphilis treatment, are four times more likely to have an unfavorable pregnancy compared to those who can manage their infection. 

If left untreated, this infection poses a risk for the unborn child. In reported cases of pregnant women who failed to receive on-time treatment, syphilis was recorded responsible for:

  • 20% of small births
  • 20% of deaths
  • 40% of stillbirths.

How Can This Problem Be Fixed?

With the currently available health programs for prenatal care, there are some measures that should be taken that will stop the spread of the infection and prevent infant deaths, suggests the Department of Health, USA.

It’s important to make syphilis screening a top-priority for women who are carrying to help identify the infection during prenatal care. This is a basic principle crucial for every country with high syphilis rates. 

If this infection is diagnosed, penicillin can help treat it. Pregnant women should seek syphilis screenings early in their pregnancy for optimal care and proper treatment. This will make sure they deliver safe and healthy babies. 

By promoting the importance of screening and treatment for syphilis, women will be more aware of the dangers they face if they fail to get treated on time. With the help of adequate promotion, women can take stronger precautions to stay away from this infection. 

Conclusion

In developing countries, syphilis infection still poses a serious issue, with more and more women failing to get screened. Treatment and adequate prenatal care are vital for women in the Sub-Saharan Africa region. With proper treatment and on-time diagnosis, syphilis can easily be avoided. That’s why it’s important to raise awareness of this issue.

References

https://www.hindawi.com/journals/bmri/2019/4562385/

https://www.cdc.gov/nchhstp/pregnancy/effects/syphilis.html

https://www.cdc.gov/std/tg2015/syphilis-pregnancy.htm

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/11238427

https://www.semanticscholar.org/paper/Antenatal-syphilis-in-sub-Saharan-Africa%3A-missed-Gloyd-Chai/218fdd5577664e2cf93bdce73f1e7baae5542a3a

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